Playing Tennis During Coronavirus Outbreak

We know how important it is for people to be active, and the particular role tennis can have in the physical and mental wellbeing of those that play it. By its very nature, tennis is an activity whereby close person to person contact can be avoided, with the UK Government saying tennis is a good example of an activity that can be undertaken in a way compliant with social distancing restrictions.

The move to Step 4 on 19 July 2021 (see below) saw the removal of a large number of restrictions, with no set restrictions on how many people can take part in sport and physical activity. This was the case through the period of ‘Plan B’ restrictions and continues to be the case following the return to ‘Plan A’ on 27 January 2022.

England (updated 19th July 2021)

UPDATE: Lockdown restrictions

Following the most recent government announcement today, the LTA has updated its Covid 19 advice:

” Tennis is a naturally socially distant sport, but players should take the following steps to reduce the risk of transmission when attending and participating in tennis activity.

1. Check for COVID-19 symptoms. Before attending any tennis activity, players (like officials, volunteers and coaches) should self-assess for symptoms of COVID-19. These are:

a high temperature

a new, continuous cough

a loss of, or change to, your sense of smell or taste

If you, or anyone you live with, have one or more of these symptoms you should not attend any sporting activity, even if your symptoms are mild. You should follow NHS guidance on testing and self-isolation. If you have been informed that you need to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace (or are required to self-isolate in relation to travel), you must do so. You should not leave your isolation location in order to participate in sport and physical activity. You can find more information in the NHS guidance on how to self-isolate.

2. Follow your provider’s safety measures. The venue you are attending, coach or provider may put in place safety measures, which could include asking you to ‘check in’ using the NHS app to scan their QR code, supporting NHS Test and Trace. Whilst this is no longer a legal requirement for venues or participants, it can support NHS Test and Trace and reduce risk of transmission of the virus. (NOTE: our Club still has a register for players to record their contact details and a QR code for track and trace scanning purposes which we encourage everyone to carry on using}

3. Take part safely. As a socially distant sport, the risk of transmission of COVID-19 whilst participating is low. However, participants should continue to:

Follow good hygiene practices, to reduce the risk of transmission in sport environments. Also consider the wishes of other participants (i.e. if they do not wish to shake hands after a match).

Avoid sharing water bottles or other refreshment containers. Where possible, you should take your own drink, in a labelled or highly distinguishable container.

Face coverings are no longer required by law, but the government expects and recommends that people should continue to wear them in crowded and enclosed settings, to protect themselves and others.